Employees Have Evolved – What About Your Talent Engagement Platform?

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Talent Engagement Infographic

The World of Work is changing – shouldn’t your Talent Management platform change with it?

Yesterday’s Talent Management was designed around back-office administrative functions, while today’s Talent Management needs to be designed around strategic engagement.

Our recently published inforgraphic and companion eBook “Is It Time to Break up With Your Talent Management System” outline 10 new approaches for Engaging Talent in the Agile Era, from the Candidate Experience to Continuous Coaching, Corporate Citizenship and much more.

Check out the Infographic / eBook to find out how these 10 approaches can create real business impact on:

  • Customer Service
  • Finding and Attracting Talent
  • Turnover Rates
  • Innovation
  • Improved Earnings
  • Increased Engagement

 

Body Odor in the Workplace: 6 Tips

This guest blog has been provided by Kevin Sheridan, best-selling author and innovator in the field of Employee Engagement 

 

blog body odirUpon entering your workplace, have you ever been greeted by a foul and pungent smell?

Most of us have experienced this at least one time over the course of our careers.  Sometimes coworkers don’t shower after a long exercise routine, or they simply don’t shower often, transforming their daily physical accumulation into a roaming smelly cloud.  Sometimes people don’t wear socks, or they take their smelly shoes off under their desk.  And sometimes people routinely forget to brush their teeth in the morning.

Suddenly you find yourself in an unpleasant and awkward situation.  What can you do?  Should you say something?  If you’re in HR or you manage a team, people are likely to approach you about addressing the issue.  (Oh joy!)

Here are six useful tips for handling the problem:

  1. Ensure that your organization’s employee handbook has a dress code policy that specifically addresses hygiene. Setting the expectations and standards for the workplace will help guide employees to the right place vis-à-vis their personal hygiene.  Other specifics of the policy could include:  the use of antiperspirant or deodorant, handwashing, and avoiding wearing strong fragrances that can bother others.  Not only should these expectations and standards be outlined in your organization’s employee handbook, but they should also be addressed during the employee pre-boarding and on-boarding processes.  Sending out occasional reminders of the dress code and hygiene policy is a good option for helping people self-correct.

 

  1. Don’t make the mistake of ignoring the situation. So many people (and managers) are simply too afraid to speak to a smelly coworker.  The reality is that body odor is a very real workplace concern and will become even more so as summer approaches. Strong body odor can be incredibly disrupting.  Allowing the foul smells to breed will seriously hinder your team’s effectiveness, engagement, and productivity.  Certain team members might not want to work with or even communicate with people who have body odor, so ignoring the situation can create bigger problems for team effectiveness.  When employees work directly with clients or customers, good hygiene is even more important, as employees are a reflection of the company.

 

  1. Investigate the accuracy of the circumstances. Odor isn’t a black and white issue; it ranges in intensity.  For that reason, it’s important to be fair and use good judgement.  If someone comes to you with concerns about a coworker, try to determine whether the odor is truly disruptive to the work environment.  Is it likely bothering multiple people or just the person who reported it to you?   Make sure someone isn’t just being mean or judgmental to a coworker, and determine whether the situation violates the policy in the employee handbook.  Not only is this evaluation the fair thing to do, it also protects you from a potential workplace fairness lawsuit.

 

Also, during your investigative process, make sure you are sensitive to factors that may influence personal grooming practices, such as medical conditions, religious beliefs, and mental health.  For example, many people who suffer from depression begin ignoring their personal hygiene.  If you think poor hygiene is only a small part of a larger issue, you should focus on getting the employee the help he or she needs.  If you have access to employee resource groups, share that information.  Further, if you think a medical condition or religious belief may prohibit someone from using deodorant or fragrances, you wouldn’t want to press the hygiene issue.

 

  1. Recognize that you may be doing people an enormous favor by talking to them about their body odor. Yes, it’s awkward to address, but people with bad B.O. are often completely unaware of how it is perceived by others.  Most people don’t want to be stinky. By having a respectful conversation, the person could ultimately be saved further embarrassment, or worse, an aggressive confrontation by another coworker or customer.  That brings me to the next tip.

 

  1. Approach the person with both dignity and respect. Recognize that your dialogue is likely to be incredibly embarrassing for them, and as such, you should be extremely empathic.  Needless to say, this should be a private conversation.  Try using the tactic of presuming the person is using hygiene products like saying, “Hey, I wanted you to know something before others on our team noticed.  I don’t think that particular brand of toothpaste or mouthwash is working for you.  Maybe you should try a different one.”  Or open the conversation by saying, “Several years ago, one of my coworkers pulled me aside and let me know that I sometimes had noticeably bad body odor.  In retrospect, I cannot thank him enough for letting me know.  It turns out, I was using a deodorant that wasn’t working for me and my body type.  I found the brand that worked best for me and problem solved!  I wanted to have the same kind of conversation with you…”

 

  1. Fill your work area with things that smell good and/or ward off bad smells. Yes, sometimes the best offense is a great defense.  As long as they are allowed by your organization’s policies, consider using any or all of the following:

 

  • Scented candles
  • Flowers
  • Plants
  • Salt lamps to purify the air
  • Air fresheners
  • Aromatherapy scents (some of the best scents are natural—lilies, chamomile, lavender, and jasmine)
  • Fans to improve air circulation

 

Here’s hoping that these tips help make your workplace smell like a bunch of freshly-cut flowers!

 

Kevin Sheridan is an internationally-recognized Keynote Speaker, a New York Times Best Selling Author, and one of the most sought-after voices in the world on the topic of Employee Engagement. For six years running, he has been honored on Inc. Magazine’s top 100 Leadership Speakers in the world, as well as Inc.’s top 100 experts on Employee Engagement. He was also honored to be named to The Employee Engagement Award’s Top 101 Global Influencers on Employee Engagement of 2017.

 

Having spent thirty years as a high-level Human Capital Management consultant, Kevin has helped some of the world’s largest corporations rebuild a culture that fosters productive engagement, earning him several distinctive awards and honors. Kevin’s premier creation, PEER®, has been consistently recognized as a long-overdue, industry-changing innovation in the field of Employee Engagement. His first book, Building a Magnetic Culture, made six of the best seller lists including The New York TimesWall Street Journal, and USA Today. He is also the author of The Virtual Manager, which explores how to most effectively manage remote workers.

 

Kevin received a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 1988, concentrating his degree in Strategy, Human Resources Management, and Organizational Behavior. He is also a serial entrepreneur, having founded and sold three different companies.

 

Links:

www.kevinsheridanllc.com

Twitter
LinkedIn 
Email: kevin@kevinsheridanllc.com

Using HR Software to Improve Work-Life Balance

This guest blog has been provided by Jessica Barrett Halcom. Jessica is a writer for TechnologyAdvice.com with specializations in human resources, healthcare, and transportation. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay and currently lives in Nashville, TN.


The idea of work-life balance isn’t so much an idealistic goal as it is a near-urgent need, now reaching levels of criticality. Stress is at an all-time high with 80% of workers feeling stressed on the job. Add to that rising workplace violence and health and personal problems due to work-related stress, and we’re nearing crisis stage. Couple the stress of the job with long commutes, the demands of family life, and an increase in living expenses, and it’s easy to see why more people are craving and requiring better work-life balance.   

As employers and leaders, what opportunities do we have to help our employees realize a better overall quality of life through balancing careers and personal lives? Technology has blurred the line between personal and professional lives. The physical locations and hours that one conducts business have expanded from the typical 9-5 Monday-Friday. People check email from their smartphone while sitting on the beach in the Riviera Maya and text their spouse between meetings to finalize dinner plans.

What are some ways that we can alleviate the stress of a demanding job? Turning to human resources (HR) software has some surprising benefits. Here are some ways that using HR software can improve work-life balance.

Recruitment Tools

Set the right tone from the beginning by using recruitment tools that make the application and interview process seamless and simple. Use a tool that allows applicants to search for positions, upload a resume, and answer pre-interview questions as quickly as possible and within an intuitive interface. A positive user experience starts a candidate off right and shows that you respect their time. Additionally, this same software can begin the onboarding process as soon as an offer is accepted, so your new hires feel like a part of your culture immediately.


Social and Recognition Tools

Social media is so widely used now that it makes sense that instant messaging platforms have popped up as a workplace social solution. Online, asynchronous communication tools and HR software can make it easier for teams to communicate regardless of location or time zone differences. Why not use these tools to encourage employee connection?

Use technology to share pictures from recent vacations, chat about what employees did over the weekend, or announce happy news like an engagement to build relationships and further balance work with life. Many HR software platforms include a running list of important anniversaries and birthdays. See if you can’t extend these features or integrate them with your communication tools.


Benefits Administration

Not long ago, employees were required to fill out forms, have them approved by their manager, and then hand deliver them to the HR department to have that information entered in to the system by another employee. When an employee had a baby, they’d need to show up at the office as soon as possible after giving birth to fill out a life event form. So many unnecessary manual processes!

One of the simplest ways to improve work-life balance with HR technology is through an online benefits administration portal that allows employees to change their own life events, update healthcare benefits changes, and participate in wellness programs–without having to schedule a face-to-face meeting with an administrator.


Work Schedule Management


For many people, taking time off, especially in the form of a well-deserved vacation, is essential to work-life balance. Having the ability to see the team’s work and vacation schedule in a transparent and easy-to-navigate format makes scheduling and requesting time off effortless for both employees and their managers. Modern HR software includes calendars or calendar integrations that track employee time off and scheduling to give employees the power to schedule their own time off around the needs of the team.


Learning Management Systems & Individual Development Plans


Part of a balanced life means the opportunity to keep growing and developing. Tight work schedules, location, and job requirements can make professional growth difficult. Having a learning management system (LMS) built right into your HR technology makes it simple for employees to take courses when and where it works best for them. Within an LMS system, employees can also create an individual development plan (IDP) they can work on with their leader in order to identify the next step in their career and map out how to get there.


Go Mobile

Mobile platforms hold a critical place in ensuring that HR technology is an important part of improving work-life balance. Now that most other business software like customer relationship management (CRM) and enterprise resource planning (ERP) software have moved to the cloud for mobile access, this feature is expected. No longer does an employee have to travel to the physical office to complete work, adding flexibility to schedules. When companies choose mobile HR software, they help employees by extending that flexibility. The world is mobile and working from a smartphone or tablet is essential to employees finding a way to balance the demands of their fast-paced lives.

As more employees value an employer’s ability to ensure quality of life, it’s critical that employers and leaders do their part to help employees find better ways to improve and achieve work-life balance. One of the easiest ways to improve workflows (and therefore job satisfaction) for employees is by implementing software that eases manual processes and provides a central communication hub for the entire company.

Be careful when choosing your software, as siloed platforms that don’t exchange information can cause more manual work and problems than they solve. A fully-integrated human capital management (HCM) software can bring many of the features mentioned in this article together in a single, easy to manage platform. The best HCM software will give companies full customization access to combine the features they need into an interface that works best for them.



Is It Time to Break up with Your Talent Management System?

Engaging Talent

10 New Approaches for Engaging Talent in the Agile Era

This blog is an excerpt of the eBook written by Cary Schuler, SVP Marketing & Product Strategy, Vibe HCM.

As we leave the last vestiges of the industrial revolution behind us, organizations are pushing the envelope in terms of how they organize and engage their teams. Bottom line business results remain top priorities but organizations increasingly strive to balance growth with a desire to be good corporate citizens. Adding to the mix is a highly diverse group of tech-savvy, socially connected millennials and new agile work methods. The result is a need to rethink traditional approaches to talent management.

Business Trends Impacting Talent Management:

Disengaged Workforce
According to Gallup’s State of the Global Workplace Report, 85% of employees are not engaged or actively disengaged (Gallup, 2017). They are showing up but not giving their best ideas and efforts. Or worse, they are actively working against the organization and have one foot out the door. What a tremendous wasted opportunity. Businesses in the top quartile of employee engagement are 17% more productive and 21% more profitable than those in the bottom quartile (Gallup).

Rise of the Socially Connected Workforce
Bersin By Deloitte indicates that citizenship and social impact were rated as critical or important by 77% of respondents (”The Rise of the Social Enterprise”, Bersin By Deloitte, 2018); effectively underscoring the importance today’s workforce places on relationships inside and outside of the organization. Millennials, in particular, are extremely team-oriented and enjoy making social connections and friends at work.

Shift from Hierarchical to Networked Agile Workforces
Traditional enterprise software was designed to support rigid, hierarchical approaches to talent management. The focus was on getting data in the system, filling out forms, following processes. Contrast this with a new networked, agile way of work, characterized by: just-in-time decision support, connecting teams with experts, outcomes versus processes, talent moving in and out of multi-disciplinary teams based on the particular project.

Today’s talent management systems (TMS) were designed in the same mold as traditional enterprise software. TMS suites evolved to span recruitment, performance management, learning and development and compensation management. The challenge lies in the fact TMS were created as systems-of-record; not tools for engaging employees. They were designed for administrative reasons – to capture data, complete forms and route approvals through complex workflow processes.

From overly complex form-based applicant tracking systems to demotivating once-a-year performance reviews, TMS at best get in the way of agile processes and at their worst, can actually disengage and demotivate talent. These TMS are too rigid and compartmentalized to effectively support talent driven organizations, where the goal is to engage employees in a more agile connected world.

Download Our Free eBook

to explore the role that next generation talent engagement capabilities, deployed as components of an HCM Engagement Platform, play in supporting organizations as they adapt to this rapidly changing world of work. We outline 10 new strategies illustrating how technology can be an enabler of the new way of work versus reinforcing outdated administrative approaches. These 10 strategies tie directly to what employees value in their work and fulfill a meaningful role fostering a highly engaged productive workforce.

 

Cary Schuler, SVP Marketing & Product Strategy at Vibe HCM is a business strategist passionate about redefining the way companies leverage technology to maximize the potential of its people. Intent upon transforming workforce applications to recognize and harness the inherently social nature of its people.

Specialties: HR Management, Employee Engagement, HR Tech, HCM, Talent Management, Onboarding, Business Strategy, Assembling High Performance Teams, SaaS, Strategic Alliances

8 Ways to Spot Fake News

This guest blog has been provided by Kevin Sheridan, best-selling author and innovator in the field of Employee Engagement

fake news

8 Ways to Spot Fake News

Do you have your B.S. Radar turned on?  In today’s digital and multi-media age, the ability of identifying “fake news” and false information could never be more important.  Underscoring the importance of this skill is social media’s effect on accelerating the spread of false information.  Thus, the need to teach people how to identify and refute the fake information has become a new and burgeoning workplace trend.

It’s not that all of the people spreading the misinformation are liars.  In fact, many of the culprits unknowingly spread the fake news, since they believe the information is true.

Here are the 8 most useful ways to spot the bullshit, whether in person, on T.V., or online:

  1. Validate the source of the information. Does it come from an expert, or someone who is at least knowledgeable about the subject?  Might the source have a hidden agenda?  What does this person or company stand to gain by sharing the information?  For example, research studies should be conducted by an impartial organization that has zero ties to stakeholders in the study (e.g., a study on the benefits of drinking milk that is sponsored by the Dairy Association is likely to be biased).

 

  1. Try and detect whether people are trying to hide the reality that they know very little, if anything, about the topic. Studies have proven that people often B.S. in order to hide their lack of knowledge on the subject at hand.1  Conversely, those same studies have shown that if people know they will be challenged about an assertion, they are significantly less likely to bullshit about it.1

 

  1. Ask questions that accurately assess if the information is true, and whether it has been sensationalized. For example, percentage changes can be significant or insignificant depending on the numbers.  Headlines are written to grab people’s attention, but they are often much more dramatic than the stories themselves.

 

  1. Ask for proof that assertions are true. Simply put, check and survey the facts.  Nowadays, there is a lot of speculation for things that “could” happen.  Watch for this language; it makes it possible for people to say anything as if it were fact.

 

  1. Pay close attention to the person’s eye contact and body language. Most people think gaze aversion is a sign of deception. Intuitively, this makes sense.  However, it might come as a surprise that research shows liars often overcompensate by deliberately maintaining more eye contact than do truthful people.2

 

  1. Notice when people discount the opinions of the known experts on the subject. It is not uncommon for bullshitters to try and gain credibility and persuasion by poo-pooing experts’ conclusions.  For example, when people who don’t have a background in science say that scientists are wrong, it’s a red flag.  Of course it’s possible for non-scientists to know more about a scientific topic than scientists, but it’s unlikely.

 

  1. Make a self-assessment as to whether you are physically and/or mentally tired while you are hearing the information. Research has shown that people are prone to accepting false information when their cognitive resources are exhausted.

 

  1. Trust your gut; it’s bigger than you think. Human intuition is very strong.  When something doesn’t seem quite right, there’s a good chance you’re picking up on a real problem.

 

It’s everyone’s responsibility to stop the spread of fake news.  Before believing what you hear, or worse, sharing it with others, make sure you consider these tips for spotting B.S.  Remember the well-known adage: If something sounds too good (or bad) to be true, it probably is.

Sources:

  • Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, March, 2018.
  • Psychology Today, 2014.

 

Kevin Sheridan is an internationally-recognized Keynote Speaker, a New York Times Best Selling Author, and one of the most sought-after voices in the world on the topic of Employee Engagement. For six years running, he has been honored on Inc. Magazine’s top 100 Leadership Speakers in the world, as well as Inc.’s top 100 experts on Employee Engagement. He was also honored to be named to The Employee Engagement Award’s Top 101 Global Influencers on Employee Engagement of 2017.

 Having spent thirty years as a high-level Human Capital Management consultant, Kevin has helped some of the world’s largest corporations rebuild a culture that fosters productive engagement, earning him several distinctive awards and honors. Kevin’s premier creation, PEER®, has been consistently recognized as a long-overdue, industry-changing innovation in the field of Employee Engagement. His first book, Building a Magnetic Culture, made six of the best seller lists including The New York TimesWall Street Journal, and USA Today. He is also the author of The Virtual Manager, which explores how to most effectively manage remote workers.

 Kevin received a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 1988, concentrating his degree in Strategy, Human Resources Management, and Organizational Behavior. He is also a serial entrepreneur, having founded and sold three different companies.

 

Links:

www.kevinsheridanllc.com

Twitter
LinkedIn 
Email: kevin@kevinsheridanllc.com

 

The 7 Characteristics of a Great Recruiter

7 character of a great rec.

This guest blog has been provided by Kevin Sheridan, best-selling author and innovator in the field of Employee Engagement

 

The 7 Characteristics of a Great Recruiter

Last month we polled nearly 130,000 HR/OD/Talent Management/Senior Executives about the top traits of a great job recruiter.  We thought it would be extremely valuable to identify these traits, since 86% of staffing firms feel they are doing a good job recruiting, yet only 60% of job candidates report having a positive experience during the recruiting process.1

The results are in and the top characteristics are listed below in the order most frequently cited by respondents:

 

  1. They have great listening skills.

The highest-performing and most effective recruiters harness the power of careful listening, which far better ensures they:  1.  Fully understand the details of the exact job description, 2.  Are acutely aware of the client’s preferences and expectations, and 3.  Accurately assess “the match” between the job position and potential candidates.

 

  1. They ask the right questions before beginning the job search.

The best recruiters do not settle on standard and basic job descriptions.  Instead, they dive right in to the detailed, and exact, job description before beginning to recruit candidates.  They are equally as detailed when interviewing candidates, gaining an in-depth understanding of each candidate, including experience, values, beliefs, characteristics, and goals.

 

  1. They have great perseverance.

The most awesome recruiters are incredibly persistent and do what it takes to fill the job with the right candidate, often before or after the work day begins and ends.  They are not hesitant to schedule interviews after hours to accommodate candidates who are currently employed, as those are often the very best candidates.  These recruiters also tirelessly follow up with candidates, thereby building long-lasting and more meaningful relationships.

 

  1. They are highly organized.

Job searches are rich with many moving parts and dynamics.  The best recruiters employ exhaustive organization practices to stay ahead of the curve and focused on the right corresponding priorities.  While applicant tracking systems provide some help and support, long-term recruiting success is achieved through more than just software.  Setting clear, specific, and prioritized objectives requires extremely thorough organization skills.

 

  1. They are awesome networkers and extremely good at relationship building.

Outstanding recruiters easily build rapport and relationships that last a very long time.  An outgrowth of this characteristic is trust, both with the hiring organization and the job candidates.  Great recruiters firmly believe in personal relationships, and as a result, earn the undying trust of everyone involved.  In addition, these amazing recruiters possess strong communication skills and simply love to network with others.  Remember that a candidate who trusts his or her recruiter are far more likely to divulge mutually beneficial information to help determine when an accurate “match” exists.

 

  1. They are eager to get on the phone with potential candidates, but more importantly, they like meeting in person.

While emailing and texting is now the norm, superior recruiters take the time to speak with candidates directly to better and more accurately assess whether there is the “right fit.”  Furthermore, this personal touch creates more meaningful and long-lasting relationships.

 

  1. They are not afraid to pull out of an agreement if it does not feel right.

This attribute is a great one since it is not uncommon for some recruiters to panic and feel pressed to make the deal just to get it over with.  Great recruiters give much scrutiny to pairing candidates with open positions, thereby avoiding recruiting for the same position again a few months down the road.

 

Hopefully this list has sparked some ideas for better evaluating recruiters.  Hiring the right people for the right seats on the bus is no small feat.  Make sure your recruiter is ready for the task!

 

A special thanks to all the people who submitted feedback for this piece!  Your ideas will help thousands of people improve their recruiting processes!

 

Source:  1.  Echogravity Study, January 2018.

   Kevin Sheridan is an internationally-recognized Keynote Speaker, a New York Times Best Selling Author, and one of the most sought-after voices in the world on the topic of Employee Engagement. For six years running, he has been honored on Inc. Magazine’s top 100 Leadership Speakers in the world, as well as Inc.’s top 100 experts on Employee Engagement. He was also honored to be named to The Employee Engagement Award’s Top 101 Global Influencers on Employee Engagement of 2017.

 Having spent thirty years as a high-level Human Capital Management consultant, Kevin has helped some of the world’s largest corporations rebuild a culture that fosters productive engagement, earning him several distinctive awards and honors. Kevin’s premier creation, PEER®, has been consistently recognized as a long-overdue, industry-changing innovation in the field of Employee Engagement. His first book, building a Magnetic Culture, made six of the best seller lists including The New York TimesWall Street Journal, and USA Today. He is also the author of The Virtual Manager, which explores how to most effectively manage remote workers.

 Kevin received a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 1988, concentrating his degree in Strategy, Human Resources Management, and Organizational Behavior. He is also a serial entrepreneur, having founded and sold three different companies.

 

Links:

www.kevinsheridanllc.com

Twitter
LinkedIn 
Email: kevin@kevinsheridanllc.com

Thinking of dating your co-worker? Think again.

This guest blog has been provided by Kevin Sheridan, best-selling author and innovator in the field of Employee Engagement

 

jim and pamThe recent and poignant worldwide conversation on sexual harassment and abuse of power has spawned a more expansive dialogue about whether consensual relationships in the workplace are acceptable.

For years, the modern workplace has proven to be a very reliable matchmaker.  In fact, an estimated 22% of American couples met at work.1  In addition, fully 35% of workers worldwide report having at least one relationship with a coworker in the past, 37% of males, and 34% of females.2 And fully 84% of Millennials are open to dating a coworker.1

Barack and Michelle Obama.  Bill and Melinda Gates.  Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt.  Gwen Stefani and Blake Shelton.  All of these famous people met their love at work.

Objectively, there are pros and cons of dating someone at work.  On the one hand, considering dating someone at work has the benefit of widening the potential pool of love interests.  On the other hand, many people fear the drama that comes with the post-breakup aftermath, as well as being perceived as “unprofessional.”  With that said, think of Jim and Pam from the television show The Office.  They each found someone special and there was no terrible breakup.  That can happen in real life too.

Some people don’t even want to date their coworker, and simply come up with “work arounds” (pun intended).  Of the 35% of the Match survey respondents who had “dated” a coworker, 65% of them had a one-night stand, and 56% of them had a FWB relationship.  That is “Friends With Benefits,” of course.

As inferred in my opening paragraph here, and largely due to the #MeToo movement, organizations are now reconsidering what “human resources” means to some employees and revisiting their workplace dating policies.  Simply put, the climate has never had more grey area.  Yes, in the past, the lion’s share of organizations had policies prohibiting managers from dating people they manage.  But now these dating policies are burgeoning into whole new areas.  Some organizations are adopting more draconian steps, such as prohibiting any workplace dating whatsoever.  Others are requiring “Love Contracts” to be signed, otherwise known as “Consensual Romance In The Workplace” contracts.  These “Love Contracts” may sound a little awkward to facilitate (or enter into), but they make a lot of sense from a legal perspective.

If your organization is concerned with issues arising from dating in the workplace, you might want to consider making Love Contracts a part of your HR policy.  A typical Love Contract requires both parties to agree to the following terms:

  • Acknowledge that they recognize their employer as an Equal Opportunity Workplace.

 

  • Affirm that their employer does not tolerate any form of harassment, abuse of power, and/or discrimination.

 

  • Agree to report any perceived harassment, abuse, and/or discrimination to management.

 

  • Recognize that they have knowingly entered an entirely consensual relationship.

 

  • Maintain complete professionalism at work, despite their personal relationship, especially if their personal relationship ends.

 

  • Promise that their relationship will not have a negative impact on their work or productivity.

 

  • They will not engage in any public displays of affection or other behaviors that might create a hostile work environment for others, or that might make others uncomfortable.

 

  • Agree that their relationship may require them to transfer to another department and/or remove any other conflicts of interest in the organization’s workplace.

 

  • Concur that they will not participate in any workplace decision-making process that could affect one another’s pay, promotion opportunities, hours, shift, performance reviews, or career, both while the personal relationship exists, as well if, and after, the relationship ends.

While love may be in the air, as well as what we consistently yearn for, organizations need to better protect themselves and their employees more than ever.  Have you?

 

Sources:

  • Huffington Post, 2015
  • Match, Singles in America Study, 2015

 

Kevin Sheridan is an internationally-recognized Keynote Speaker, a New York Times Best Selling Author, and one of the most sought-after voices in the world on the topic of Employee Engagement. For six years running, he has been honored on Inc. Magazine’s top 100 Leadership Speakers in the world, as well as Inc.’s top 100 experts on Employee Engagement. He was also honored to be named to The Employee Engagement Award’s Top 101 Global Influencers on Employee Engagement of 2017.

 

Having spent thirty years as a high-level Human Capital Management consultant, Kevin has helped some of the world’s largest corporations rebuild a culture that fosters productive engagement, earning him several distinctive awards and honors. Kevin’s premier creation, PEER®, has been consistently recognized as a long-overdue, industry-changing innovation in the field of Employee Engagement. His first book, building a Magnetic Culture, made six of the best seller lists including The New York TimesWall Street Journal, and USA Today. He is also the author of The Virtual Manager, which explores how to most effectively manage remote workers.

 

Kevin received a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 1988, concentrating his degree in Strategy, Human Resources Management, and Organizational Behavior. He is also a serial entrepreneur, having founded and sold three different companies.

 

Links:

www.kevinsheridanllc.com

Twitter
LinkedIn 
Email: kevin@kevinsheridanllc.com